Migrantólogos

Los que estudiamos la migración

Novena edición de las Jornadas de Jóvenes Americanistas 2018: "Violencias en las Américas"

 

 

El Centro de Estudios Mexicanos y Centroamericanos (CEMCA, México),
el Instituto Francés de Estudios Andinos (IFEA, Lima)
la Casa de Velázquez (Madrid) y
la Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia (UNED, Madrid)


invitan a estudiantes de maestría y doctorado a enviar sus propuestas para participar en 

la novena edición de las Jornadas de Jóvenes Americanistas 2018

con el tema

"Violencias en las Américas"

que se llevarán a cabo de manera simultánea en la Ciudad de México y Madrid
el 21 y 22 de mayo de 2018
 

¿Puede la violencia extrema que sufre América Latina en la actualidad ser un observatorio privilegiado de los fenómenos de violencia en función de distintas escalas temporales y espaciales? La «violencia de retribución» (Beik, 2007) de los subalternos que reclaman justicia puede oponerse a la «violencia legítima» del Estado (Weber, 1998 [1971]), a la «violencia simbólica» (Bourdieu, 2012) de las instituciones, o incluso a la violencia estructural de la opresión de clase, de género o de raza. Como un fenómeno incorporado a las conciencias y los cuerpos, la violencia se manifesta por el crimen o el enfrentamiento, pero también, de forma menos espectacular y más duradera, por el trauma o el silencio. Por tanto, un análisis contemporáneo de las violencias en las Américas deberá ... 

Más en: http://bit.ly/2AO6V7m

 

 

CEMCA – Sierra Leona 330, Col. Lomas de Chapultepec, Del. Miguel Hidalgo, CP 11000 

Tel. (+5255) 55405921 al 23

Desplazamiento forzado interno en México.





Fenómeno Social No Reconocido. 22 de noviembre 11:00 hrs.

CALL FOR PAPERS: Irregular Migrants, Refugees or Trafficked Persons?




Anti-Trafficking Review

Guest Editors: Claus K. Meyer and Sebastian Boll

 

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Deadline for Submissions: 7 January 2018

 

The Anti-Trafficking Review calls for papers for a themed issue entitled 'Irregular Migrants, Refugees or Trafficked Persons?'

 

Migration, displacement and human trafficking have become staples of headline news. Reactions range - and sometimes change - from outrage over abuse and sympathy for individuals and groups seen as victims, to open hostility towards those perceived as foreign intruders or threats to security, political, cultural and business interests.

 

Where international instruments of varying age and origin provide a set of at times overlapping categorisations, policy-makers and public discourse often look for clear classifications and impose mutually exclusive labels on groups and individuals, whose circumstances are complex, diverse and not always well understood. Such categorical overlaps, however, may be exploited at the expense of the individuals concerned. It is hardly surprising then that persons caught in this legal and conceptual web prove at times wary of the labels offered to or imposed upon them.

 

Further, aid agencies and organisations working in the areas of migration, displacement, and human trafficking cannot avoid the contest over categorisations and classifications either. Legal definitions help shape opportunities for and conditions of assistance while public perceptions associated with different terms impact on available funds. Donors of aid programmes expect accountability, which requires clear classifications of those provided with assistance. But actual needs for assistance may cut across rigid differentiations between migrants, refugees or trafficked persons.

 

The response to migration, displacement, and human trafficking is thus in part contingent upon conceptual schemes and classifications and at the same time impacts upon them. This themed issue of the Anti-Trafficking Review seeks to interrogate this interdependence and the challenges resulting from it.

 

Contributors are invited to engage with, but need not limit themselves to, the following questions:

  • How do individuals respond to labels such as migrant, refugee, trafficked person or modern slave applied or available to them? What motivates these responses?
  • How and to what extent can individuals assert their own agency and express their own views of their circumstances in the face of categorisations and classifications by public discourse, state authorities, or aid agencies?
  • How are public perceptions shaped and articulated in relation to these labels?
  • How are government and non-government service providers impacted by such categories in their ability and willingness to extend services to different populations?
  • To what extent, and in what ways, are advocacy and assistance efforts shaped, enhanced or limited by categories in international and national law, or the labels - and changes therein - dominant in public discourse?
  • How do problems of, and contests over, classifications impact the compilation of data on migration, displacement, human trafficking and related forms of exploitation?

 

The Debate Section of this issue will invite authors to defend or reject the following proposition: 'It is important and necessary to make clear distinctions between (irregular) migrants, refugees and trafficked persons'.

 

The Review promotes a human rights based approach to anti-trafficking, exploring anti-trafficking in a broader context, including gender analyses and intersections with labour and migrant rights. Academics, practitioners, trafficked persons and advocates are invited to submit articles. Contributions from those living and working in developing countries are particularly welcome. The journal is a freely available, open access publication with a readership in over 100 countries. The Anti-Trafficking Review is abstracted/indexed/tracked in: ProQuest, Ebsco Host, Ulrich's, Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association, Directory of Open Access Journals, WorldCat, Google Scholar, CrossRef, CNKI and ScienceOpen. 

 

Deadline for submissions: 7 January 2018.

 

Word count for full article submissions: 4,000 - 6,000 words, including footnotes, author bio and abstract.

 

Word count for debate submissions: 800 - 1,000 words, including footnotes and author bio.

 

Special Issue to be published in September 2018.

 

We advise those interested in submitting to follow the Review's style guide and submission procedures, available at www.antitraffickingreview.org. Manuscripts should be submitted in line with the issue's theme. Email the editorial team at Esta dirección de correo electrónico está siendo protegida contra los robots de spam. Necesita tener JavaScript habilitado para poder verlo. with any queries.

 

Thematic Issue Guest Editors: Claus K. Meyer and Sebastian Boll

 

Editor: Borislav Gerasimov

 

www.antitraffickingreview.org

 
 

Migración Mexicana de Retorno. Viernes 24 de noviembre de 2017


EN LA SALA DE COMPARECENCIAS DEL SENADO, UBICADO EN: AV. PASEO DE LA REFORMA 135, ESQ. INSURGENTES CENTRO, COLONIA TABACALERA, DELEGACIÓN CUAUHTEMOC, CIUDAD DE MÉXICO.

Call for papers at ASA next summer.

 

 

I am happy to announce the exciting set of four paper sessions that the International Migration Section has planned for the 2018 meetings in Philadelphia (see below).

For submission information, please go to http://www.asanet.org/annual-meeting-2018/section-sessions

 

Cecilia Menjivar

 

 

 

Immigrant Occupational Niche Formations

Social scientists and historians have long observed that immigrant groups concentrate in specific occupations. While some niches involve the self-employed others engage those employed by existing firms or government, and occupations range from infotech entrepreneurs to taxi drivers and from cardiologists to landscapers. These patterns have important consequences for economic growth, occupational mobility and financial security for both the migrant groups so involved and for the larger society. And while some of these concentration are regarded as mobility traps, others offer participants opportunities for higher wages than those employed in the broader economy and the ability to avoid discriminatory treatment from members of the larger society.
This session seeks presentations that document the existence and functioning of occupations that are dominated by specific immigrant groups in various points of settlement. Papers that develop theoretical innovations are most welcome, especially those focused on gendered patterns of group-specific control over occupations, patterns of intergroup succession in occupational domination, and the relative importance of discrimination and of group self-determination in creating patterns of group-specific occupational concentration.
Nazli Kibria (Boston University)
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Steven Gold (Michigan State University)
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Immigration, Federalism, and Integration in U.S. States and Localities

Though the entry of immigrants into the United States is ruled by federal law, states and localities are now heavily involved in enacting legislation that shapes immigrants’ lives. This session focuses on the role of subnational governments in immigration law and immigrants’ integration in the U.S. Papers are invited that analyze why and how subnational jurisdictions legislate on immigrants and immigration, and the impact of that legislation on the ground for immigrants, organizations, law enforcement, employers, social services, politics, and the economy. We are also interested in papers that consider intersectional issues, such as race and gender, in shaping subnational governance and outcomes.
Jennifer Jones (University of Notre Dame)
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Angela Garcia (University of Chicago)
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Innovative Methods in Immigration Research

In terms of data, migrants are often classified as a “hidden” population. Due to sparse data, information on their movement and integration within some countries is relatively unknown. For example, migration statistics, in some jurisdictions, are few. Data on immigrant integration can be even more elusive. At the same time, however, new quantitative and qualitative methods for data collection on migrant populations are being developed, including different forms of big data, new estimation techniques, and innovative ethnographic work. This session seeks to discuss some of the most innovative methods researchers are using to measure the movement of migrants globally and their integration into country populations.
Phillip Connor (Pew Research Center)
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Social Inclusion and Exclusion and International Migration

This session examines the relationship between social inclusion & exclusion and international migration. Inclusion and exclusion refer to the degree to which individuals and groups are included or face involuntary exclusion from a society’s political, economic, and social processes. Recent events—such as the restriction of civic and political rights for immigrants holding a range of legal statuses; the demand for human rights among the children of immigrants throughout Western Europe; and the outlawing of minarets through a national referendum in Switzerland—suggest that processes of social inclusion/exclusion and international migration may be linked. Prospects for social inclusion are encoded in policy, and the individuals subject to said policies could conform to or resist the rules and regulations imposed on them in a number of ways. We invite papers that explore the opportunities for and constraints to immigrants’ social inclusion that policies create, and that those subject to the policies internalize or contest. Authors may draw on any relevant empirical case using whatever methodology they prefer, but research that examines the structural, social, and/or cultural incorporation of immigrants—broadly defined—is essential.
Loretta Bass (University of Oklahoma)
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Asad Asad (Harvard University)
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Section on International Migration Refereed Roundtables (1 hour)


Ali Chaudhary (Rutgers University)
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